vine


vine
Vineyards and their produce were of great economic, social, and religious importance in Palestine. When the Israelites after the Settlement in Canaan began to cultivate them, it signalled their intention to stay, for the vine needs long-term and intensive care. The climate was favourable; the hilly terrain suitable—more so than for cereals. Vineyards needed protection from thieves and booths were erected at the time of harvest (Isa. 1:8). Isaiah also describes (Isa. 5:1–7) the different stages required to secure a successful harvest.
Wine [[➝ wine]] was used for barter (2 Chron. 2:10) as well as for feasts (Dan. 1:5, 8, 16) and in worship (Jer. 51:7; Isa. 28:7–8; cf. Acts 2:13). Early Christian leaders were advised to be temperate (1 Tim. 3:3, 8), though not to be total abstainers, like the OT Rechabites (Jer. 35:7–9). Wine [[➝ wine]] was drunk at the Passover festival, and Jesus blessed it at the Lord's Supper (Mark 14:23, 25) and the rite became universal in the Church (1 Cor. 11:25). The vine is used as a symbol of Jesus by the gospel of John (15:1) and Christians are its branches.

Dictionary of the Bible.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • viné — viné …   Dictionnaire des rimes

  • Vine — Vine, n. [F. vigne, L. vinea a vineyard, vine from vineus of or belonging to wine, vinum wine, grapes. See {Wine}, and cf. {Vignette}.] (Bot.) (a) Any woody climbing plant which bears grapes. (b) Hence, a climbing or trailing plant; the long,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • VINE — (Heb. גֶּפֶן). Of the various agricultural products mentioned in the Bible and talmudic literature, the vine and its products – yayin ( wine ), tirosh ( new wine ), ḥemer ( sweet red wine ), and shekhar ( strong drink ) – occupy the central place …   Encyclopedia of Judaism

  • vine — [ vaın ] noun count * 1. ) the plant on which GRAPES grow: GRAPEVINE: vine leaves a field of vines 2. ) any plant with a long thin stem that grows along the ground or up a tree, wall, etc. a ) the long thin stem of a plant that grows in this way… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • vine — [vīn] n. [ME < OFr vine < L vinea, vine < vineus, pertaining to wine < vinum, wine, akin to Gr oinē, vine, oinos, wine, prob. a loanword from a pre IE language of the Pontus region (> Heb yayin)] 1. a) any plant with a long, thin… …   English World dictionary

  • Vine — ist der Name folgender Personen: Ruth Rendell (Ruth Barbara Rendell, Baroness Rendell of Babergh; Pseudonym Barbara Vine; * 1930), britische Bestseller Autorin Frederick Vine (* 1939), Geologe und Geophysiker Diese Seite ist eine Beg …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • vine — (n.) c.1300, from O.Fr. vigne, from L. vinea vine, vineyard, from vinum wine, from PIE *win o , from an Italic noun related to words for wine in Gk., Armenian, Hittite, and non I.E. Georgian and West Semitic (Cf. Heb. yayin, Ethiopian wayn);… …   Etymology dictionary

  • vinė — vinė̃ sf. (4); KlvK111, Rtr, KŽ žr. vinis: 1. Apvynioja aplink vinę i peša Klm. 2. Grėblio vinė̃ nulūžo Rsn …   Dictionary of the Lithuanian Language

  • vine — [vaın] n [Date: 1200 1300; : Old French; Origin: vigne, from Latin vinea vine, vineyard , from vinum; WINE1] 1.) also grapevine a plant that produces ↑grapes 2.) a plant with long thin stems that attach themselves to other plants, trees,… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • vine — ► NOUN 1) a climbing or trailing woody stemmed plant. 2) the slender stem of a trailing or climbing plant. ORIGIN Latin vinea vineyard, vine , from vinum wine …   English terms dictionary

  • Vine — Frederick John …   Scientists


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